Development

Gocoverage - Simplifying Go Code Coverage

Go introduced vendoring into version 1.5 of the language. The vendor folder is used as a dependency cache for a project. Because of the unique way Go handles dependencies, the cache is full code from an entire repository; worts and all. Go will search the vendor folder for its dependencies before it searches the global GOPATH. Tools have emerged to corral the vendor folder and one of my favourites is glide.

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How to Test in a Microservices Architecture

The testing of microservices is inherently more difficult than testing monoliths due to the distributed nature of the code under test. But distributed applications are worth pursuing because by definition they are decoupled and scalable.

With planning, the result is a pipeline that automatically ensures quality. The automated assurance of quality becomes increasingly important in larger projects, because no one person wants to or is able to ensure the quality of the application as a whole.

This article provides some guidelines that I have developed whilst working on a range of software with microservice architectures. I attempt to align the concepts with best practice (references at the end of this article), but some of the terminology is my own.

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Go-Micro - Opinions and Examples

I recently undertook a time-boxed four hour spike to investigate another Go microservices framework. Go-Micro is a “RPC framework for microservices”. It aims to provide common components that are often used in microservice deployments. It advertises itself as providing a pluggable architecture and boasts a long list of compatibilities.

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Cohesive Microservices with GoKit

Whilst working on a cross-orchestration reference microservices application this week, my colleagues and I from Container-Solutions and WeaveWorks ported all of our simple Go microservices to the GoKit framework.

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The Benefits of Outsourcing Research and Development

When I think about my business, I often end up at one fundamental business truth. The goal of any business is to make profit. This is achieved by either making more money or reducing costs. Often, business activities are outsourced to experts in order to achieve one of these. For example, I outsource my accounting to an expert, in order to a) ensure that I’m being tax efficient (save costs) and b) because I lack the expertise and the time/desire to obtain it (save costs).

Most traditional outsourcing routes (e.g. accountancy, recruiting, etc.) affect either making more money (e.g. marketing) or reducing costs (e.g. recruiting). Outsourcing research and development is different, in that it can benefit your business in both of these ways.

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