Blog

What is Cloud-Native?

Cloud-Native, a collection of tools and best practices, disrupts the ideas behind traditional software development. I am a firm believer of the core concepts, which include visibility, repeatability, resiliency and robustness.

The idea begins in 2015 when the Linux Foundation formed the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation. The idea was to collect the tools and processes that are often employed to develop cloud-based software.

However, the result was a collection of best practices which extend well beyond the realms of the cloud. This post introduces the essential components: DevOps, continuous delivery, microservices and containers.

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How to use Javascript Promises to lazily update data

Last week I was working on a simple implementation updating a shopping cart for a site, the frontend was written in html/javascript. The brief - when the quantity of an item in the cart was modified the client could press an update cart button which would update the cart database, after which it was necessary to recalculate the total values of the order and refresh the page with the new totals.

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What is the Cloud?

The terms “Cloud” or “Cloud Services” have become so laden with buzz that they would be happy to compete with Apollo 11 or Toy Story. But the hype often hides the most important aspects that you need to know. Like how it works, or what you can do with it. This is the first of several introductory pieces that focus on the very basics of modern applications.

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Surprise at CPU Hogging in Golang

In one of my applications, for various reasons, we now have a batch like process and a HTTP based REST application running inside the same binary. Today I came up against an issue where HTTP latencies were around 10 seconds when the batch process was running.

After some debugging, the reason for this is that although the two are running in separate Go routines, the batch process is not allowing the scheduler to schedule the HTTP request until the batch process has finished.

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Gocoverage - Simplifying Go Code Coverage

Go introduced vendoring into version 1.5 of the language. The vendor folder is used as a dependency cache for a project. Because of the unique way Go handles dependencies, the cache is full code from an entire repository; worts and all. Go will search the vendor folder for its dependencies before it searches the global GOPATH. Tools have emerged to corral the vendor folder and one of my favourites is glide.

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How to Test in a Microservices Architecture

The testing of microservices is inherently more difficult than testing monoliths due to the distributed nature of the code under test. But distributed applications are worth pursuing because by definition they are decoupled and scalable.

With planning, the result is a pipeline that automatically ensures quality. The automated assurance of quality becomes increasingly important in larger projects, because no one person wants to or is able to ensure the quality of the application as a whole.

This article provides some guidelines that I have developed whilst working on a range of software with microservice architectures. I attempt to align the concepts with best practice (references at the end of this article), but some of the terminology is my own.

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Go-Micro - Opinions and Examples

I recently undertook a time-boxed four hour spike to investigate another Go microservices framework. Go-Micro is a “RPC framework for microservices”. It aims to provide common components that are often used in microservice deployments. It advertises itself as providing a pluggable architecture and boasts a long list of compatibilities.

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Cohesive Microservices with GoKit

Whilst working on a cross-orchestration reference microservices application this week, my colleagues and I from Container-Solutions and WeaveWorks ported all of our simple Go microservices to the GoKit framework.

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An Overview of Mesos' New Unified Containerizer

This week I was lucky enough to have spend some time with Mesos 1.0.0-RC1 and specifically, the new unified containerizer. But first, let’s discuss what has existed for the last few years.

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The Benefits of Outsourcing Research and Development

When I think about my business, I often end up at one fundamental business truth. The goal of any business is to make profit. This is achieved by either making more money or reducing costs. Often, business activities are outsourced to experts in order to achieve one of these. For example, I outsource my accounting to an expert, in order to a) ensure that I’m being tax efficient (save costs) and b) because I lack the expertise and the time/desire to obtain it (save costs).

Most traditional outsourcing routes (e.g. accountancy, recruiting, etc.) affect either making more money (e.g. marketing) or reducing costs (e.g. recruiting). Outsourcing research and development is different, in that it can benefit your business in both of these ways.

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